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Ackerman Syndrome

What is Ackerman Syndrome?

Ackerman Syndrome is a genetic defect that causes familial syndrome of fused molar roots with a single canal (taurodontism), hypotrichosis, full upper lip without a cupid’s bow, thickened and wide philtrum, and occasional juvenile glaucoma. Ackerman Syndrome is found in less than 1 in 1,000,000 people.

What are the symptoms of Ackerman Syndrome?

Common symptoms of Ackerman Syndrome include the following:
  • Fused molar roots
  • Single root canal
  • Juvenile glaucoma
  • Sparse body hair
  • Full upper lip
  • Abnormal hair quantity
  • Deep philtrum
  • Exaggerated cupid’s bow
  • Taurodontia
  • Thick lower lip vermilion
  • Thick philtrum
  • Syndactyly
  • Increased pigmentation of finger joints
  • Clinodactyly of fifth finger

What causes Ackerman Syndrome?

Ackerman Syndrome is a genetic birth defect. The syndrome tends to run in families, suggesting an inherited genetic mutation is involved.

How is Ackerman Syndrome diagnosed?

Ackerman Syndrome has been identified in approximately 26 cases in the literature. It is a genetic disease that runs in families. Family history and ultrasound are used in the diagnosis.

What are the treatments for Ackerman Syndrome?

There is no cure for Ackerman Syndrome because is a genetic birth defect. Treatment consists of treating the symptoms present in each individual.

Where can I find out more about Ackerman Syndrome?

Ackerman Syndrome Articles

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