NFL Player Foster Moreau is in Full Remission from Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

Editor’s Note: We believe that patients are a key part of developing and leading the conversation in disease communities. Patient Worthy sometimes partners with reputable agencies that wish to speak with patients about opportunities related to their diagnosed conditions. These opportunities can include activities such as sharing stories with other patients or health professionals about their diagnosis journey or recording video testimonials. To learn more about how to get involved with an opportunity for individuals impacted by Hodgkin lymphoma, click here.

Earlier this year, New Orleans Saints’ tight end (TE) Foster Moreau faced a formidable opponent off the football field after he was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma. The Saints’ team doctor noticed an enlarged lymph node in March; further testing confirmed the diagnosis. Hodgkin’s lymphoma is rare – and Moreau had an even rarer form known as nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin’s lymphoma. This form, shares the American Cancer Society, is often slower-growing than its classic counterpart and has a promising prognosis. It is both treatable and curable. Facing cancer was scary. But both Moreau and his doctors felt good about his overall outlook.

It seems that they were correct. After months of treatment, Moreau has now entered into full remission, reports FOX Sports. Full remission means that there are virtually no traces of the cancer left.

Moreau is excited to start playing again and is preparing for the upcoming season. Shortly after his treatment ended, Moreau signed a 3-year, $12M contract with the Saints. Moreau has 12 career touchdowns. We look forward to seeing him back on the field this year and seeing what he can do!

About Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

Also known as: Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin disease

Hodgkin’s lymphoma is a cancer that affects the lymphatic system, which plays a role in your immune health. The lymphatic system consists of lymph vessels, lymphocytes, the spleen, thymus, tonsils, and lymph nodes. In Hodgkin’s lymphoma, abnormal and cancerous cells form in the lymphatic system. This prevents the body from adequately protecting itself against infection. There are four main forms of this cancer: nodular sclerosis, mixed cellularity, lymphocyte predominant, and lymphocyte depleted.

Hodgkin’s lymphoma is more common in people between 15-40 years old. While it can affect people outside of that range, it is uncommon. Doctors do not know the exact cause of this cancer. Some studies suggest a blend of hereditary predisposition and environmental factors. Treatment often includes radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and immunotherapy. If you have Hodgkin’s lymphoma, please speak with your care team to determine the best line of treatment for you.

People who have this cancer may experience symptoms such as:

  • Fever and chills
  • Drenching night sweats
  • Painless but swollen lymph nodes (often in the neck, armpits, chest, groin, or abdomen)
    • Note: However, your lymph nodes may become painful after drinking alcohol.
  • Enlarged spleen and/or liver
  • Unintentional weight loss
  • Persistent fatigue
  • Itchy skin
  • Bone pain

Editor’s Note: We believe that patients are a key part of developing and leading the conversation in disease communities. Patient Worthy sometimes partners with reputable agencies that wish to speak with patients about opportunities related to their diagnosed conditions. These opportunities can include activities such as sharing stories with other patients or health professionals about their diagnosis journey or recording video testimonials. To learn more about how to get involved with an opportunity for individuals impacted by Hodgkin lymphoma, click here.

Jessica Lynn

Jessica Lynn

Jessica Lynn has an educational background in writing and marketing. She firmly believes in the power of writing in amplifying voices, and looks forward to doing so for the rare disease community.

Share this post