How and Why You Should Get Big Money for HoFH Medication

If you or your loved one is living with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH), you’re going to be thrilled with this news–and you deserve it, too!

The Patient Advocate Foundation (PAF) just announced on November 2nd, 2015 that they’ll be increasing their efforts to help fund co-pay assistance for people living with HoFH. Obviously, patients will need to qualify first, but if/when that happens, they’ll be eligible to receive up to $15,000 annually! How awesome is that?

Orlando City SC happy excited city jump
Makes me wanna jump for joy!
Source: www.giphy.com

 

Seriously, this is great news! Apparently, a branch of the PAF called the Co-Pay Relief (CPR) Program will be managing it all to help patients get this much needed financial assistance. It’s a major opportunity for everyone with HoFH, and that includes those of you who are newly diagnosed!

Andrew Lincoln is celebrating
Yay!
Source: www.giphy.com

 

I know you’re probably still trying to get your head around HoFH.

You probably already know, after talking with your doctor, that it’s a rare genetic disorder prohibiting your liver from processing and removing the “bad” cholesterol in your body, known as low density lipoprotein (LDL). As the disease progresses, acute levels of LDL accumulate in your blood and cause atherosclerosis, which is a narrowing of blood vessels. And yeah, it’s very serious.

I’m not trying to scare you, but it’s not something that you can mess around with. You have got to seek the care of a specialist right away.

Three middle-eastern doctors holding up V-for-Victory signs.
The right doctors and treatment can mean real victories in your healthcare.

So do not delay! Call the folks at the PAF Co-Pay Relief Program: +1 (866) 512-3861 to determine if you can qualify. It’s a free call; it won’t cost you a thing to ask. You can also check out their website.


Alisha Stone

Alisha Stone

Alisha Stone has a BA in psychology and is dedicated to improving the lives of others living with chronic illnesses.

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