How to Convince Legislators to Support Dystonia

Have you ever tried to convince legislators–especially your state’s Senator to support a cause–such as dystonia–that speaks to your heart?

james stewart filibuster mr smith goes to washington no sir i will not yield classic film
Wouldn’t it be nice if ALL legislators stood up like this for dystonia? [Source: giphy.com]
If so, you’ll know that it’s difficult because you need the opportunity to persuade your Senator to act.

Too many questions that feed excuses:

  • How can ONE person make a difference?
  • Will my Senator even listen?
  • Can’t I leave it up to someone else?

Give it up, and get on it.

So, what do you need to do?

Many people have found success by writing letters and emails that outline your need for a call to action. But there are a few things you should know before you flood Washington.

This post will tell you what you need to know to make sure you understand the “Why” and “How.”

Looking for a letter template to send to your Senator? A copy and paste with fill-in the blanks? The best method to ensure you end up with writing that lets you participate but move fast, is to visit the Dystonia Medical Research Foundation.

On the fence? Consider this.

  • Each year, the United States Senate crafts an Department of Defense (DoD) appropriations bill, which includes a list of conditions that are deemed “eligible for study” through the Peer-Reviewed Medical Research Program (PRMRP).”
  • In 2010, the “dystonia” community triumphed –BUT it’s an ANNUAL review process
  • Big bucks involved – Fair share of $278 million federal funding towards research

While not necessary, another great additional resources is: Department of Defense: Congressional Directed Medical Research Programs.

 You can make a difference.

The federal funding is there.

Go after it.

Copy and paste the letter or email.

Impart and share your personal story of living with dystonia.

Keep dystonia on the mind of legislators.

Keep dystonia listed on the research bill from the DOD.

Keep dystonia federal funding for research possible.


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